Articles Archive for May 2002

Interviews »

May 21st, 2002 | 2 Comments | Category: Interviews

We all know our world is held together through a vast network of connections, and we’re all coming to realize that it’s becoming more connected and interdependent with every passing day. The question is how? In what ways are we altering our lives with this network, and how do we deal with the negative aspects of the overwhelming connectivity?

Reviews »

May 15th, 2002 | Comments Off on CTRL [SPACE] Edited by Thomas Y. Levin, Ursula Frohne, and Peter Weibel | Category: Reviews

They’re everywhere: tiny cameras, webcams, security cameras… video-capturing devices are almost as ubiquitous as the banner ads for them: “Watch anyone, anytime.” We’re all stuck somewhere between reality TV and a TV reality. Following the panopticon from an eighteenth century architectural drawing by Jeremy Bentham to the pervasive surveillance of the twenty-first century, CTRL [SPACE] is a comprehensive history of watching and being watched.

Reviews »

May 15th, 2002 | One Comment | Category: Reviews

Jacques Derrida is the founding father of deconstruction. Focusing on our use of language, Derrida (Jane Doe Films) shows the multiple layers of meaning at work. By deconstructing previous works of scholars, Derrida shows that language is a constantly shifting thing.

Interviews »

May 10th, 2002 | 7 Comments | Category: Interviews

Peter Lunenfeld is the director of the Institute for Technology and Aesthetics (ITA) and teaches in the graduate Media Design program at Art Center College of Design. He is considered one of the preeminent critics and theorists of the intersections of art, design, and technology. Afterimage referred to his edited collection, The Digital Dialectic: New Essays on New Media (MIT Press, 1999) as “the first printed book you read about the virtual world that does not merely describe it, but puts you there.”

Interviews »

May 02nd, 2002 | One Comment | Category: Interviews

The deconstruction of organized sound put forth by multi-instrumentalist composer and improviser Weasel Walter is fiercely aimed at destroying the complacency of music and musicians. This is nowhere more evident than in his rotating cast of characters known as the Flying Luttenbachers. He describes the working plan of the Luttenbachers thusly, “The nature of operations has been to utilize the most appropriate people available — pushing the resulting chemistry as far as possible — and finally to abandon the formation when creative stasis has been reached.” Though he renounces all …