Articles Archive for January 2010

Announcements »

January 15th, 2010 | No Comment | Category: Announcements
Copyright Criminals

From Kembrew McLeod:
Word up! I want to introduce my alter ego, RoboProfessor, who just finished a dance music video about digital sampling and copyright law, with an interactive component. Here’s the website: http://www.robotainment.net/musicvideo
Also, below is all the info you need about next week’s launch of Copyright Criminals. Please forward this to any interested parties, and feel free to post anywhere!
Best,
-KM
Can you own a sound?
Copyright Criminals, a documentary produced by Benjamin Franzen and Kembrew McLeod, examines the commercial and creative value of musical sampling, including the ongoing debates about artistic expression, copyright …

Announcements, Book Stuff »

January 12th, 2010 | No Comment | Category: Announcements, Book Stuff
<i>Follow for Now</i> at the University of Illinois

My friend and colleague Mike Schandorf required Follow for Now for his Writing for New Media class this semester at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He snapped this shot of the stack of copies in their bookstore. I’m stoked.
Many thanks, Schandorf. See you soonly.

Announcements »

January 07th, 2010 | No Comment | Category: Announcements
<i>Follow for Now</i> on Google Books

Now you can get Follow for Now for your Sony Reader (or other non-Kindle eBook device) via Google Books. Their format allows you to read books on the screen of your choice.
Of course, it’s also still available for Amazon’s Kindle and, if you prefer, as a good ol’ paperback from the following fine places:

Powell’s in Portland, OR.
Reading Frenzy in Portland, OR.
Skylight in Los Angeles, CA.
Last Gasp in San Francisco, CA.
MonkeyWrench in Austin, TX.

If you are near any of these stores, support the independent: Buy my book there. If not, it’s …

Reviews »

January 04th, 2010 | 6 Comments | Category: Reviews
Culture, Computers, and Communities:<br> Two Recent Books

Culture is technology-driven William Gibson once said, and, with the proliferation of digital media, the aphorism is less and less debatable (if it ever was). If technology is indeed the engine and infrastructure of our culture, then understanding it is tantamount to understanding ourselves.
The books written on the topic could fill a library, and two recent ones caught my eye. The first attempts a broad-reaching macro-view. Brian Arthur’s The Nature of Technology: What It Is and How It Evolves (Free Press, 2009) promises not only to get to the bottom …